15 Reasons Why Toodlers Are Such Angry Little People

Toddlers get a bad rap. Their lives are tumultuous and filled with people who just don’t understand that they need their sandwiches cut into perfect triangles that don’t touch each other under any circumstances. And the juice should be in the blue cup…I mean the red cup…no, it’s actually the blue. Life is hard for these little dictators because sometimes they need to feel the satisfying crunch of a thousand Cheerios under their feet and most people are trying to take this away from them.

Of course, they feel angry. Who wouldn’t?

Here are some other reasons why toddlers are probably so angry all of the time:

1. They fall down a lot.

Have you ever seen how often those little shorties bite the big one? I don’t know any official numbers, but it’s often. I’d be pissed too if I was falling down all day long on legs that just weren’t working properly.

2. Moms don’t get shit right.

It’s not that hard, really. Moms should be able to figure out that clothes are painful to toddlers extremities, and that if your toddler wants to get into the car all by themselves, well then, the world will just need to wait.

3. There is literal crap in their pants.

And potty training is for losers.

4. Nobody understands what they are saying.

Words are hard, and sometimes screaming just feels right.

5. Everybody is trying to ‘change’ them.

If they have made a self-commitment to cry hysterically each time they don’t get to push the door button at the library, who are you to try and take this from them?

6. Nobody takes their problems seriously.

They don’t want your “help” while putting on their shoes; they just want one thousand years to get it right. Chill out.

7. Pants are the true oppressor of our great nation, and nobody seems to get this.

Toddlers get it. Legs are meant to feel all the changes of the seasons.

8. Time-outs are like jail for innocent people.

Toddlers are ruled by instinct, and their instincts tell them to say, “No!”  in a very loud voice when asked most things.

9. Everyone is always suggesting a nap.

They don’t need a nap; they just need someone to let them paint their body with syrup like God intended.

10. It’s like nobody has ever seen someone want to be naked in Target before.

Toddlers are innovators, and they predict that nudity is going to be the next trending topic.

11. It’s always, ‘hold my hand,’ ‘don’t run in the street,’ ‘don’t eat batteries,’ ‘don’t lick the cat.’

These things bring them joy. You don’t know that toddler’s life, lady.

12. They understand that the choices you are offering

them are complete bullshit.

Oh, really. They get to choose between taking a nap now or taking a nap in five minutes? They know a con when they see one.

13. There’s a never-ending list of things they need to do, and people keep jacking their shit up.

Jacking shit up — every toddler’s mom should wear a shirt that says this.

14. They haven’t known you for very long, so they need to see how long it takes for you to blow.

It’s like a long scientific experiment titled, “How fast can I make these people taking care of me lose their minds?” Their hypothesis is “very soon.”

15. Tantrums are great stress relievers.

It’s better than meditation and/or exercise according to some toddler experts.

So, next time you see a toddler losing his behavior at the grocery store, the playground, the pool, the library, the restaurant, or your own home, remember that they are just trying to live their most authentic life. Instead of trying to escape their wailing, you should really stay and watch and applaud their efforts. And give them candy.

Via Scary Mommy

This Popular Sleep Aid May Be Harmful to Kids

There’s no quick fix that gets kids to sleep sooner, better, deeper. But melatonin comes pretty close.While medical experts don’t have much bad to say to adults about using melatonin, which isn’t a pharmaceutical rather a health supplement, some are concerned when it comes to regular use in children.

A recent New York Times Well blog post reported that while a lot of parents have given melatonin for their kids because it works—doctors don’t actually know whether it’s doing harm in the long run. Children’s brains are still growing and developing, and melatonin is a synthetic form of a hormone the pineal gland produces, and which signals to the brain it’s time for sleep.

“I think we just don’t know what the potential long-term effects are, particularly when you’re talking about young children,” said Dr. Judith Owens, director of the Center for Pediatric Sleep Disorders at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Parents really need to understand that there are potential risks.”

Research isn’t conclusive but some suggests that it could have effects not just on the brain but on other systems developing in children: reproductive, cardiovascular, immune and metabolic.

Melatonin has known possible side effects for adults, including “headaches, dizziness and daytime grogginess,” the Times reports. That last one is what makes it a sleep aid and also dangerous for drivers who might use it. The hormone-like substance, which is also found in foods like barley and walnuts, can also interfere with medications for blood pressure and diabetes.

When researchers looked into consistency across melatonin products, they found that 71 percent of their samples were at least 10 percent off from the written dose.

Doctors who treat sleep disorders in children have long known parents turn frequently turn to melatonin to help their kids with sleep issues, often picking up the pills at a health food store and not telling their own doctors—a mistake.

“I rarely see a family come in with a child with insomnia who hasn’t tried melatonin,” Owns said. “I would say at least 75 percent of the time when they come in to see us” at the sleep clinic, “they’re either on melatonin or they’ve tried it in the past.”

For those who give it to their children, Owens recommends letting their child’s doctor know. She also said the pills should be picked up from a reputable source. Because they’re not regulated by the Food and Drug Adminstration, there’s no way of know how much of the useful ingredient is in each pill. Buy “pharmaceutical grade,” which tend to have “more precise dosing levels.”

When researchers looked into consistency across melatonin products, they found that 71 percent of their samples were at least 10 percent off from the written dose. In fact—and this is where parents, particularly, should be cautious—some contained nearly 5 times the dosage written on the label.

So while there’s still no silver bullet for kids and sleep—except for lots of exercise, predictable nighttime routines and early (yes, early!) bedtimes—the melatonin temptation should be met with caution and some medical support.

Contributions on this post via Mom.me

9 Things a Pediatrician Wishes You’d Stop Doing

One pediatrician tells us the truth about the things doctors wish parents would stop doing, now.
Parenting doesn’t come with a handbook, so unsuspecting moms and dads are left to figure out a lot on their own. Our go-to sources of advice—friends, the internet, our own parents—might not have the most reliable, up-to-date info. Then when we get to the pediatrician’s office, we’re either too stressed, rushed, or embarrassed to ask our questions. Doctors are great at telling you what to do, but even they might be hesitant to be upfront with parents about what not to do. So we asked Bill Bush, M.D., pediatrician-in-chief at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, Michigan, to give us the truth about the things parents should stop doing, now.

1. Stop looking to the internet for medical advice

When you’re freaked out about your child’s symptoms, the first place to turn is usually Dr. Google. And while trusted sites like the American Academy of Pediatrics can have useful info, it’s still impossible to diagnose your kid over the internet. Instead, take your concerns to your doctor. “I’ve been given websites to look up because a parent is pretty sure their child has X, Y, or Z disease,” Dr. Bush says. “I’m always happy to look and get back to them, but a diagnosis is based on our medical evaluation.

2. Stop going to the ER for everything

I’m guilty of this one. Recently my 3-year-old ran head-first into the fridge, and after blood started coming out of his nose and mouth, I rushed him to the ER without waiting for a call back from his doctor. Four hours and a $900 bill later, he was pronounced totally fine. “Except for extreme emergencies, getting a phone call in to your physician’s office gives time for the child to calm and the family to make assessments, and for us to determine if there’s an alternative place we can have you seen,” Dr. Bush says. An urgent care facility or the pediatrician’s office the next day may be better options.

3. Stop requesting antibiotics.

It’s natural to want our kids to get better as soon as possible, but Dr. Bush says antibiotics aren’t always the answer. “There are times when it’s absolutely appropriate to give the antibiotic when they have a bacterial infection, but for the majority of the patients we see with viral illnesses, it’s not,” he says. “Colds and coughs don’t need an antibiotic, they just need time to heal.” Plus, giving antibiotics too often can lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which are then harder to fight off.

4. Stop refusing vaccinations and demanding alternative vaccine schedules.

Ironically, just as some parents rush to medicine, others are scared by vaccines. Even if parents agree vaccines are a good thing, they’re concerned about giving many at the same time. “Very solid evidence exists that immunizations prevent many deadly and debilitating childhood diseases,” Dr. Bush says. “The FDA requires any new combination of vaccines to prove equal effectiveness as if they were given on separate dates so we’re not overwhelming the immune system.” The problem with delaying vaccines, especially with babies, is children then go unprotected for longer. “When you start spreading them out, you put more kids at risk,” he says.

5. Stop allowing unlimited screen time.

Let’s face it: Screens are a part of our lives now, which the AAP recognized when they relaxed their rules around screen time. But even so, Dr. Bush says to make sure your kids have outdoor play for exercise, and face-to-face interaction for social development. “Life’s about interacting with other people, so encourage children to play with their friends in person instead of texting or playing video games online,” he says.

6. Stop blaming your child’s cold on being outside.

This is one myth that just won’t die. But your kid is not going to catch a cold by going jacket-less for the 10-second walk to the car, so it’s probably not worth fighting that battle. “Viral illnesses such as colds come from the spread of germs—kids touching everything and then they touch their eyes, nose, and mouth,” Dr. Bush says. “We see much more spread of illnesses in the wintertime when kids are all condensed into one small area for the entire school day.”

7. Stop skipping well-child visits.

We all lead busy lives, and when it comes time for what we consider “non-essential” appointments, it’s easy to let them pass by. But Dr. Bush says that’s a mistake. “If we switch from providing sick care to well care, we can do a better job of preventing or managing certain diseases,” he says. This includes hearing and vision problems, heart murmurs, blood pressure elevations, kids who are failing to grow and spines that may be developing scoliosis. Plus, the visits give you and your child a chance to feel more comfortable with your doctor, so you’ll be more likely to discuss any concerns in the future.

8. Stop using Q-tips to clean your child’s ears.

You may think you’re helping your child’s hygiene, but you’re really just pushing wax further into the ears. “Kids will come in sometimes with ear pain or decreased hearing because their ears are just so packed with wax from the Q-tip not bringing it out, but pushing it back,” Dr. Bush says. Instead, allow some water to get into your child’s ears at bath time, because the moisture should help wax naturally work itself out.

9. Stop freaking out about your child’s temperature.

It can be alarming when your child develops a fever, but once they are out of the newborn stage when it may be dangerous, it’s just something else to report to your doctor. “It’s a symptom like a runny nose, cough, or pain, part of the collection of information that helps us make decisions on what’s the appropriate diagnosis and treatment,” Dr. Bush says. “It’s very rare that a fever alarms us.”

Via Parents

You love your child but sometimes…

Adrian M

I would do anything for my child, but sometimes I feel guilty to admit the truth about that sometimes I don’t like him very much. The key is that I don’t like his behavior and is not that I don’t like him as a person. When I say that I don’t like my child is probably the unappropriated behavior that sometimes I have to be the viewer, I can feel frustrated because I am tired of the constant back talk, the yelling or the arguing. Or I don’t like the way my child treats me lately, this reflection is directed toward those parents that feel the same way I feel at any age of their children.

I think there are periods of time when we don’t like our child because of a certain stage we are experiencing through. As a mother I really liked being around him, and I couldn’t imagine my life without him but at this point I disliked his behavior so much that sometimes I feel really exhaust knowing is completely natural at this point of his 2-years old and it’s all part of my child growing up and starting a life of his own, even if it’s painful at times.

Here’s an important distinction I’d like to make again: not liking your child’s behavior is very different from not liking him as a person. A child’s behavior becomes part of his personality in some ways. In fact, you often can’t see where he ends and the behavior begins and actually you also associate him with his personality as the words are coming out of your child’s mouth. You can see the nasty look on your child’s eyes sometimes even at this early age and you can hear the rude tone in your son’s voice. It’s easy to get frustrated and it becomes easy not to like the child who’s performing this type of behavior at any age.

I think it’s important to realize that sometimes kids can be a pain in the neck, just like the rest of us, is just a stage and is not connected on how much we love them.

Follow my blog for more interesting and informative articles about our children on this parenting stage.

A boy or a girl thing? Do not teach this to your children

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Do not teach this to your children…

The scene is familiar and sometimes happens to me having a boy and I can tell you I make the same mistake: My son is playing in the dirt with his trucks, cars, yelling and being loud, and of course full of energy. He’s just a happy kid playing outside and probably myself or some family member make an exclamation: he is just a boy, boys are like that or boy are more hyper than girls etc… just to mention some comments.

It is a common phrase, and even my friends and family have joked about our own children in this way. The boy we’re talking about is noisy, active and loud. Maybe he’s or will be destructive or disorganized, but I am realizing I am having issues with this comments that I personally make myself.

We are promoting a traditional and obsolete gender label. I know many people swear or believe that boys are naturally different from girls, and that may be true. But the way we talk to, or comment about it is not well about how we treat our children and the prospects and expectations we are creating. When we expect boys to be noisy, loud and active, we are tutoring them to be exactly that.

We are creating behaviors and personality based on gender. Being active does not have a gender. There’s no sex in being shy or loud or delicate, there is not gender in being funny, smart, lazy or motivated. Anyone can have these characteristics anyway beside of the sex, and our culture assigns them one anyway.

They don’t need to make a behavior a male or female thing, and what is not even appropriate and I include myself, is to do it in front of kids, every kid is different. Although some boys are loud and rough, some are more reserved and sensitive, there are plenty of boys at both who prefer read than play outside, boys who talk quietly and don’t yell out in class or on the yard. We all know that there is not just one way of being a boy or a girl. But when we say things like, “He’s all boy,” we’re creating and celebrating a pyramid of qualities. We’re saying that this is the way to be a boy.

Girls are also reaching this message. They are learning that some type of behaviors are recognized with being a boy and may feel the need to distance themselves from those types of individuals. Anyway, kids are learning what adults think boys and girls should be and how they should act from these types of comments.

If we don’t want our children to be aggressive or destructive or bad-mannered, don’t defend these actions, teach them what’s right and what is not. Expect more from me also, and I will expect something different from others. Follow my blog for more tips and informative articles.

Monica 🙂

WHO IS HARDER TO RAISE?

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Boys vs. Girls:

Can we finally answer the great parenting debate over which sex is more challenging to raise? I truly believe in the results.

Here are some results :

Discipline :
Who’s harder? Boys
Why don’t boys seem to listen? Turns out their hearing is not as good as girls’ right from birth, and this difference only gets greater as kids get older. Girls’ hearing is more sensitive in the frequency range critical to speech discrimination, and the verbal centers in their brains develop more quickly. That means a girl is likely to respond better to discipline strategies such as praise or warnings like “Don’t do that” or “Use your words.” “Boys tend to be more tactile they may need to be picked up and plunked in a time out chair. They’re also less verbal and more impulsive, he adds, which is especially evident in the toddler and preschool years.
These developmental differences contribute to the mislabeling of normal behavior as problematic, a growing number of observers say.

Physical Safety:
Who’s harder? Boys

Boys, being natural risk takers, may need encouragement to slow down a little, but maybe girls need to be encouraged to take more risks. Look for opportunities for your daughter to jump off a wall, swim in the deep end, or try the bigger slide.

Communication:
Who’s harder? First boys, then girls

From birth, a girl baby tends to be more interested in looking at colors and textures, like those on the human face, while a boy baby is drawn more to movement, like a whirling mobile. In a nutshell, girls are rigged to be people-oriented, boys to be action-oriented. Because girls study faces so intently, they’re better at reading nonverbal signals, such as expression and tone of voice. Boys not only learn to talk later than girls and use more limited vocabularies, they also have more trouble connecting feelings with words.

As girls get to be 8 or so, things can get harder: The flip side of being so adept at communicating is that girls exert a lot of energy on it. There can be a great deal of drama around who’s mad at whom, who said what and why, and more. Start when your daughter’s a toddler to establish an open communication, so she learns she can come to you for advice.

Self-esteem:
Who’s harder? Girls

Developing a healthy self-image is critical to all kids. But as the more compliant and people-oriented gender, girls tend to grow up less confident and more insecure than boys, researchers say.

Make no mistake, helpfulness and nurturing are virtues for everybody. But this tendency in girls makes it smart to help her explore and strengthen her inner nature and encourage her to try new things.
Body image is a big part of self-esteem, and though there’s certainly body-image dysfunction in boys and men, it remains mostly a female issue. The natural rounding out of the body that happens in puberty clashes with the unnatural slimness girls see in the culture around them.
Teach your daughter to listen to her body’s signals of hunger and satiety. Girls who listen to their bodies tend to listen to their instincts in other areas. Sports are a great way for girls to build confidence and a healthy appreciation for their bodies.

School:
Who’s harder? Mostly boys
Boys and modern education are not an idyllic match. An indoor-based day and an early emphasis on academics and visual-auditory learning ask a lot of a group that arrives at school less mature. In their early years, most boys lag behind girls in developing attentiveness, self-control and language and fine motor skills.
The relatively recent acceleration of the Pr-K and kindergarten curricula has occurred without awareness that the brain develops at different sequences in girls and boys. Music, clay work, finger painting, and physical exercise early-ed activities that once helped lively kids acclimate to school are vanishing. Few teachers are trained in handling the problems that result.
One area where girls do less well in school concerns spatial learning, such as geometry. Girls may use different parts of their brains to process space perceptions. The key is for parents to present both boys and girls with plenty of no-pressure opportunities to try out the areas that are challenging.

I obtained some information from Parenting since I had my son I truly believe how boys are more difficult to raise specially at early ages. For more articles and tips follow my blog.

 

 

7 WAYS TO SOOTHE A SICK TOODLER 

As adults, the second we feel cold symptoms coming on we’re likely to pop open the medicine cabinet and raid the pills and syrups for something to make us feel better. However, when our young children fall ill, many medicines are an absolute no. We hate to see our sweet ones suffer not to mention our own lack of sleep and many parents feel helpless without a go-to medicine to ease their child’s symptoms. Here are some mom-tested, pediatrician approved tips and tricks to get you through your kiddo’s next nasty cold, naturally.

1. Prop them Up: Keeping a child sitting up may seem counter intuitive to soothing them to sleep, but angling your little one up with pillows at about a 45-degree angle can aid with nose drainage. Nasal symptoms are usually worsened by lying down, where post-nasal drip can run down the back of the throat or pool in the sinuses. Ditch the irritating cough or stuffy nose by propping up your child with pillows or even stacking books under the head of their mattress. If you can coax them to sleep in this position, it will keep them breathing easy throughout the night.

2. Honey for Your Honey: If you can’t give your little one medicine, what can be done? Honey may be the answer. This ages-old remedy has been scientifically proven to reduce cough frequency and severity. Two teaspoons about half an hour before bedtime can make everyone’s night more restful. However, do not give honey to babies under twelve months, as there is a risk for infant botulism, a rare but potentially deadly illness. Alternatively, you can also try agave syrup instead.

3. Saline and Steam: There’s a reason that a hot bath can cure what ails you. Breathing in steam can loosen up a stuffy nose and provide relief for irritated nasal passages. You can always run your child a warm (but not too hot) bath and trap steam in the bathroom by closing the door and keeping the exhaust fan off. A humidifier is a great investment and can seriously improve stuffy nights for you and the kiddos. Another safe option is saline nose spray. Gently tilt your child’s head back and deliver one or two sprays per nostril. Wait a couple of minutes, then use the nasal aspirator (or better yet, the snot sucker,) or have your child blow their nose gently.

 

4. Heat for Healing: Electric blankets and heating pads simply aren’t safe for child use. Yet, a heating pad can provide sweet relief for a kiddo suffering from body aches. Create your own heating pad with a sock (made of natural fibers) with rice inside. You can warm it up in the microwave to a safe temperature, and the rice retains heat for quite awhile. For extra soothing, add essential oils such as lavender or peppermint to aid with congestion issues.

 

5. Feed a Fever  and a Cold: While some age old adages are filled with wisdom, others are not so smart. The old expression “feed a fever, starve a cold” does more harm than good. Your child needs as many nutritious calories as she can get, especially if she’s under the weather, the chicken soup it really does help alleviate symptoms. So if your little one is a chicken fan, this is probably one of your best options.

 

6. Fluids, Fluids, Fluids : Another reason to give your sweet one chicken soup is that it contains liquid to keep them hydrated. One of the biggest factors that prolongs and worsens colds is dehydration, and it’s one of the more dangerous side effects of being sick. Keep pushing the fluids by having a sippy cup handy at all times and reminding your child to drink. Another way to sneak fluids in is to offer your child all natural or sugar free fruit Popsicle.

7. Rest and TLC: Parents are often reminded of the importance of routine in a child’s life (sometimes it feels like we’re beaten over the head with it!) However, when your little one is ill, let them set the schedule. Not nap time yet? That’s OK, she needs her rest. Get your cuddles on! Touch has been proven to lessen anxiety and decrease the time needed to recover from injury and illness.
Remember to follow the doctor’s orders regarding medication usage, and to seek medical attention if symptoms persist or get worse. It might be difficult caring for your little one when you feel like you can’t do anything to help without medication, but this list will give you a few things to try.

I hope you found 7 ways to soothe a sick toddler informative. Follow my blog for more useful tips and information about your kids and the parenting stage.

How to Deal With Back Talk From Your Kids

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When a child is being verbally disrespectful or as we called it in our home, “emotionally biting” someone, a parent’s defensive wall goes up and she screams right back! Parents who are having loud, ugly words screamed at them would react. The question is, “is there another option?” Yes, there is.

First, let me say that I firmly believe that parents should not be disrespected or have to endure any kind of emotional rudeness, but it does happen. Once it happens a parent feels like there’s only one thing to do to stop it: punish! I want to offer another way, one that not only stops the rude and disrespectful behavior in tracks but also teaches.

Remember when your baby’s cry was her only form of communication? Rude, disrespectful behavior is also a form of communication. Verbal disrespect and rude words are a volatile expression of feelings that haven’t (otherwise) been verbalized. The feelings need to be released or all sorts of things may happen.

When a child is screaming horrible things at you, the first thing you need to be aware of is your desire to scream back, “Don’t you dare talk to me that way!” or “Who do you think you are?” or “You’re g-r-o-u-n-d-e-d!”

I’m not going to lie; it’s hard, and it’s normal to want to retaliate. But screaming and punishing in response doesn’t address or resolve the original feelings that caused your child to be disrespectful. They don’t teach a child how to manage the intense tidal wave he or she is feeling. Punishing her makes her swallows her intense emotions and will only cause those same feelings to erupt again in a different form.

Parents tend to think children get angry on purpose. Your child doesn’t know how she got so mad. Her anger is a mystery to her. It’s also a cry for help. To a child, being really mad feels scary, like she’s out of control and her feelings have a life of their own. When you say, “Stop it now,” she thinks, OK, but how do I hold this tidal wave of feelings back? Please show me, don’t punish me.

Parents need to accept that intense feelings are part of growing up. You are their safe place; you need to teach your child how to deal with volatile feelings by doing it yourself. How? Could be by showing her something other than reacting, and screaming at her?

Imagine for a moment that a parent and a child are standing opposite each other. Stretched between them is a rope. As the child yells, she pulls on the rope and let’s go. A tidal wave of emotion leaves the child and travels across the rope and hits the parent. Now covered in imaginary emotional goo, the parent pulls on the rope as she yells back. It becomes a tug of war, an emotional war.

In order for a parent to teach a child how to handle a tidal wave of intense emotions, the parent has to disengage and drop the rope, thereby stopping the tug of war, before any talking or resolution can begin. This is the crucial turning point. You’ve stopped things from continuing to escalate, and have turned things toward resolution.

Your child will try to get you to reengage. She’ll scream mean words at you and she’ll be rude. Stay silent. Do not reengage; do not pick up the rope! As soon as your child realizes that you’re not reengaging, she will also realize she was out of line. Now is the moment for action.

You might say, “When you get this upset, you need to calm down first, hit something, and release your anger (through exercise, or whatever the rule is in your house) before talking to me.” Once your child has released the anger, invite her to talk: “Now please begin with an apology and let’s talk about your feelings calmly.”

By dropping the rope and stopping the emotional tug of war, you’re able to get to the crucial turning point and turn things toward resolution instead of keeping the “war” going by yelling and punishment.

I hope your found this article informative, I obtained this information from PopSugar.com I truly believe that our children are our reflection. If you are interested in more informative and educative, or just tips in your parenting life follow my blog.

 

 

A Little Reflection To A Full Time Working Mother

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Dear all of us,

I see you there same as myself everyday. We are the ones arriving to work 30 seconds before the time to not be considered late, we have been up since early in the morning to get dressed, served breakfast, and dropped off at a school our children on the way to the office.  Sometimes your pants are a little wrinkled or you makeup is not fully complete.

We are anxiously checking our cellphone during the day to see the camera at their school (in my case) since my son is 2-years old and this little one has been sick for four consecutive days.  We pray that daycare won’t call us to pick them up because we have no more sick days specially starting the year in January, to use them all, and we are in panic to ask our boss to leave early one more time.  Someone asks us to go out to lunch, but we passed because we have to go to buy some groceries, milk, diapers or something else needed at home.

When others are staying at work to get ahead for tomorrow, we are rushing out the door to pick up our kids because after a specific time the school charge you $1.00 per an extra minute and we have already been away from our children already more than 9 hours.  We can’t wait to have them back in our arms even knowing that they drive us crazy most of the times.  We feel like everyone else is doing better at their job than us.  When we are at work we feel guilty that we aren’t with our kids. If we had to evaluate ourselves, we’d say that we are an okay Mom and an acceptable employee, definitely not an exceptional mother for your point of view.

I can’t forget to mention the hurry after I pick up my child from school to get home and attempt to cook something healthy, sometimes not that healthy but I refuse to stop on drive thrus, probably my options are not healthy for some but healthier than others, I don’t compare; I just try to do the best I can for my son and family.

Your stay- at- home mom friends often wish they could work outside their home or just have a little adult conversation…We most of the time feel a little bit jealous of them, and we worry that our kids are missing out on having a close group of friends to play with.

I also see that we have a way of calm that many others do not. Just mentioning that most of the time things start to go wrong at work and I am the last one to overreact.  It’s obvious that this disaster is a small dimension compared to raising kids under the age of five.  I see the kindness in our eyes when a teammate is complaining up about a mistake made and that is nothing anymore for me. Others wonder about my tolerant, patience, and forgiving attitude comparing on how I was when I was not having kids. Nothing stresses me more at work anymore than working full- time and raising my son.

Working does not make us less of a mom.  Being a mom doesn’t make us a fragile employee.  If we are working because our family depends on it financially, I congratulate us and congratulate myself, we need to be proud of what we are achieving.

Sincerely,

Mom of a toddler

Understanding your children‘s emotions

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Emotions are part of the humans inside, understand them is needed to live in harmony around people and with ourselves. It Is necessary to understand your emotions and live in peace with them, we need to understand as well the peoples’ and recognize the consequences of fight them down.

Do not put down your children’s emotions, the consequences could be negative on their behaviors. In this post, I would like to share with you some of the consequences and thoughts on how to put down your children’s emotions can affect them seriously.

  • Feeling emotions is not sometime negative in our life’s; putting down or ignore your child’s emotions would let them think that is showing a negative feeling.
  • They will learn not to cry and show his emotions in a different way like anger and fury, as an effect they can develop mental problems in the future.
  • They will feel confuse once they want to cry and won’t know what to do when they are feeling sad and will hide to cry thinking there is something bad as the illusion that only fragile and weak people cry.
  • Kid will grow up without emotional intelligence and will disconnect from their heart developing health problems.
  • The lack of creativeness and connection with their emotions won’t let them be real and won’t show their authenticity showing their real personality.
  • They will develop immature personality having difficulties to understand others individuals in their environments.
  • They will be able to blame other people on the way they feels, instead to find a solution on how they feel.
  • Once they experience a difficult situation like the lost of a family member for example, they will have more chances to commit suicidal acts.
  • Kid will feel useless and won’t have their self steam strong and define, since they are not having the emotional support from their parents or guardians.
  • As adults they will feel some time of bitterness and resentment about their life because they did not learn how to express their emotions.
  • In school they could face mistreatment and neglecting, especially when they are little, and in the job place as adults because they would not know how to express emotions.
  • They could develop some addictions as drinking, drugs, smoking and all type of addictions since he will feel empty inside

As a parents we need to take the time to understand our children since they are born, and also on all the phases on their lives. They need us to understand the way they are feeling inside.

Children needs to understand their emotions , we need to let them laugh, cry, and get angry; they need to understand that emotions are normal; with time they will understand the meaning of each emotion to find the solutions and feel better as individuals.