8 Things That Become Annoying After Becoming a Parent

Before becoming a parent, I probably could have come up with a pretty decent list of things that annoyed me. Things like people chewing with their mouths open and slow drivers in the fast lane mostly just the obvious offenders that annoy most other people too. But since become a parent? Well, let’s just say that the list of annoyances has grown exponentially, though most of the things that make the list are things that would’ve been no big deal in the pre-parent days. Here are lists of things that have become annoying since becoming a parent.

1. The UPS guy who rings the doorbell

Pre-kids, the UPS guy ringing my doorbell was a neutral event in my day. Actually, it was probably an enjoyable event in my day; because it meant some fun item or another awaited me in a package. Now I sort of want to punch the UPS guy (or anyone for that matter) who dares to ring my door bell and wake my baby from his nap.

2. The fact that Costco doesn’t open until 10:00 AM

Before parenthood, I rarely tackled errands before 10:00 AM—because, sleeping in on Saturdays. But now? 10:00 AM rolls around and I’ve probably been up for four hours. I mean, seriously? The day is halfway over by 10:00, Costco. The parents of this nation need economy size boxes of baby wipes and 3-packs of milk and we need it before 10:00 AM. Perhaps I should start a petition.

3. The chatty checker at the grocery store

OK, this was a little annoying before kids as well, but after kids it’s on another level. I’m sorry chatty checker, I really don’t want to hear your life story and I definitely don’t want to tell you mine while my kid is making a mess. I don’t even care. Not even a little bit.

4. Any and all lines

Waiting in lines is never a super fun task for anyone, but it had always just been a part of life. But waiting in lines with kids can be downright hellish. And waiting in line behind someone whose club card isn’t working or who can’t find a coupon while my kid is crying doing even get me started.

5.People who get offended by public breastfeeding

Before becoming a parent, I recognized that some people just don’t feel comfortable with breastfeeding in public. Even though I found it silly, it didn’t annoy me really. After becoming a parent, the ridiculousness of taking offense to breastfeeding annoys me to no end. Seriously people, you’ll see more cleavage walking past Victoria’s Secret on your mall walk then you’ll see while someone is feeding their baby. Get over it.

6.People who talk about their pets incessantly like they are their babies

I’ve never been a super huge animal person, but if other people want to compare and treat kids as a pet and talk about them as such who am I to resent them? Well, after having kids, I find the behavior a lot more annoying. And please do not compare your animal to my child. Totally not the same.

7.Phone calls over text

Talking on the phone is not my jam, but if I had information to communicate I had always been more than happy to give a quick phone call. Now, I basically send all phone calls straight to voicemail. I pretty much would like everyone I know to ask them before calling me: “Is this information that could be conveyed via a text message?” If the answer is yes, then please send a text. It will be much more pleasant for both of us to not have to carry on a conversation while my children yell in the background.

8.Glitter

I suppose the reason I never real took issue with glitter before having children is because I didn’t really have to encounter it very often in my daily life. In the adult world, very few things are festooned with glitter for glitter’s sake. Unfortunately I have learned that in the world of children glitter is on EVERYTHING. Literally everything. And subsequently it is all over my house as well. Glitter is most definitely the herpes of craft supplies and I wouldn’t be particularly sad if it no longer existed.

I identify myself on this POST ! Life changed drastically after having kids, I hope you identify also on this post from my blog about Things that become annoying after having kids

 

 

My Only Child Doesn’t Need A Sibling

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Via mom.me

By Leah Campbell

I have this amazing friend who is basically a single mama superhero. She is stunning (in the kind of shape I have never in my entire life been in), successful in her career, completely committed to parenting and always jetting off on some new adventure or another with her sidekick—a little girl who is full of her mama’s spunk and energy.

I am not kidding you when I say I look at this mama some days and wonder how in the heck she does it all.

But recently she posted something on Facebook that struck me. It was about the numerous comments she gets regarding how her daughter “needs” a sibling, and how rude, presumptuous and downright out-of-line those comments are.

As I read her post, I thought to myself, “You go, Mama!”

For the record, I have always wanted a large family. The idea of having an only never really crossed my mind, until I dealt with infertility, enduring singledom (I think they used to call it “spinsterhood”) and the realization that my daughter (adopted in the most serendipitous of ways) and I have a pretty damn good life together. If it is only ever just the two of us, both she and I will be just fine.

She doesn’t need a sibling any more than I need another child. Which is to say, it would be nice—and I certainly remain open to the possibility—but I also see the beauty ahead in the life I could create for us if it is only ever just her and me.

You know what kids need? Love, support, guidance, food, shelter and maybe a little more love. But a sibling?

I think people mean well enough when they comment on the need for a sibling. Nobody intends any harm; they are simply remembering back to their own childhoods, to the fun they had with their siblings, or the loneliness they may have felt as only children themselves. Plus, we all know the stereotypes surrounding only children, and I have certainly known an only child or two myself who has lived up to those stereotypes.

But what people forget is that those really are just stereotypes. The recent research points to the fact that only children are not nearly as lonely as we’ve been led to believe, and that they actually fare better than kids with siblings in some areas, including academic pursuits. And, as long as we’re talking in anecdotes, I’ve also known only children in my past who in no way lived up to the stereotypes attributed to them; they were kind, generous, loving people who were raised by parents that worked hard to mold them as such.

Whether or not a child has a sibling is not the defining factor for the type of person they will become, and no child needs a sibling. You know what kids need? Love, support, guidance, food, shelter and maybe a little more love. But a sibling? That’s about as crucial to development as a puppy—sure, lessons can be gained from the added responsibility, but it certainly isn’t the only way to grow into a responsible adult.

Look, if I am ever blessed with another child, I have no doubt my daughter will benefit from having a little brother or sister to grow up alongside. But she’s not going to grow into a spoiled, selfish person without one—which, let’s be honest, is the underlying implication whenever anyone suggests that a child needs that brother or sister.

How about instead of commenting on the size of other people’s families, or when/if they should add on to those families, we instead make a solemn vow to recognize that it’s none of our business. Not only because you have no idea what another family has dealt with (infertility, loss or struggles in their romantic relationship that make adding on seem like a bad idea) but also because no child needs a sibling. And asserting that they do is just kind of an asshole thing to say.

Don’t be an asshole. Just don’t comment on another person’s family. Because you don’t know the whole story, and your compilation of anecdotal evidence does not make you an expert on what any child might need.

One thing I can say for sure? My friend’s little girl is going to be just fine if she is forever an only child. Mostly because she has a superhero for a mama. One who works hard, every single day, to make sure she has everything she needs—and so much more.

I completely identify myself on this post. I hope you found it crucial found some comfort  if you are experience some similar situation.

Monica R.

6 things every son needs from his mom

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Boys tend to have a warm relationship with their mother. It is natural for a son to want to be close to her and protect her. To boys, their mother is the most beautiful, most perfect woman in the world. Her faults are practically invisible to her sons.

Fathers bring out more of a boy’s adventurous, playful side, with the possibility of more risky pranks and greater physical impact; “while the mother is for her son, the good, the welfare, the law, in a word, the Godhead in a form accessible to children,” said Henry Fredéric Amiel.

The balance of a mother/son relationship is critical for normal growth and development of the child’s personality. The boy needs to feel that he is accepted and loved unconditionally, that he can approach and seek protection at any time and will be welcomed. To deny these needs can bring about severe consequences. The hurt acquired in childhood shapes a person’s character. Physical and/or psychological abuse coming from the person who the child loves and trusts the most, will make a child feel that the world is hostile and should be handled with violence and self-defense.

So what do boys need from their mothers?

  1. Love

Tell your son how much you love him, and let it be clear. Demonstrate gestures of acceptance. He will in turn reflect that love to you and to others.

  1. Teaching

Your son wants and needs to be taught. Teach him to do good, the difference between right and wrong, to be self-sufficient and to be independent.

  1. Space to Grow

Instruct him, set good examples for him and then trust him to try things on his own.

  1. Loving Correction

Give him room to make mistakes, and to learn from them. Correcting your son’s mistakes firmly but kindly will help him want to do the right thing. Humiliating correction, on the other hand, produces the opposite effect.

  1. Limits

Setting limits is important. If a child feels that you cannot control his inappropriate behavior, he will feel like he is stronger than you and will try to manipulate you. On the other hand, if you overwhelm your son with inappropriate limits, he will feel no confidence and have difficulty getting and keeping jobs in the future. Setting appropriate limits will help him succeed.

  1. Physical contact

Hug and kiss your child. Look into his eyes, smile at him and play and laugh with him. Let your son seek your hand when he needs support, and let him meet your eyes’ approval when he is feeling insecure. Make your arms available when he is happy or needs a shoulder to cry on.

Mothers, you will discover that a son, who depends on your love and the security that it conveys, is one of the best gifts God has given you. I hope you like this article 6 Things every son needs from his mom

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“HURRY SON”….hurry….

“Hurry up,” “Faster”Yes, I tell my son to move fast without hesitation, question or guilt. “Move fast” are two words that have been ingrained in my mind since I myself was a kid, and thank goodness moving fast is one of life’s most important abilities that many modern parents, I think, are dropping the ball about when it comes to teaching our kids life skills.

No, we don’t want our children rushing through life without enjoyment. No, we don’t want our kids to be unappreciative of the present. But, do I believe we can enjoy life and be mindful at a faster pace? Yes. 

The faster you move, the more you can fit into your day. It’s pure math.

But how can you enjoy anything if you’re just moving fast? You’re teaching your kids to rush through life?!

Moving fast helps us cope with the ongoing issue of so much to do, so little time that every single mom I know deals with. I load the dishwasher fast. I dress fast. I put on my seatbelt fast. I fix my bed fast. I refuse to waste precious time on things that matter less than more important stuff, and it’s a strategic skill I’m trying to teach my son every day as they grow up.

I tell my son to “hurry up and move fast” for his own future survival in a demanding world. “If you make decisions fast, get dressed quickly and don’t waste time on unimportant stuff throughout your day like getting out of the car, then you’ll have more time to play and spend quality time on things you actually like to do.” 

The more I train him to move quickly, the better prepared he will be for life’s swift-moving and overabundant to-do’s when they’re adults. They’ll be better equipped to handle a busy, full life with ongoing family/work/personal responsibilities than the kids who were raised being able to take their sweet time getting shoes on back in the day.

Am I wrong?

But how can you enjoy anything if you’re just moving fast? You’re teaching your kids to rush through life?! I’m glad you asked. And while this may not be an answer everyone likes, it’s true: Not every single tiny thing in life requires pure and uninterrupted enjoyment—some things just need to get done and be done.

Do we really need to’ enjoy the act of brushing our teeth? I’ll argue no. In fact, I’ll argue that moving quickly requires extra concentration on the immediate task at hand so that we may do it quickly, without distraction, and move on to the next thing. 

Now excuse me, but my time here is up. It’s been a blast. But I’ve got a dishwasher to unload. 

This article originally appeared on Mom.me