8 Things That Become Annoying After Becoming a Parent

Before becoming a parent, I probably could have come up with a pretty decent list of things that annoyed me. Things like people chewing with their mouths open and slow drivers in the fast lane mostly just the obvious offenders that annoy most other people too. But since become a parent? Well, let’s just say that the list of annoyances has grown exponentially, though most of the things that make the list are things that would’ve been no big deal in the pre-parent days. Here are lists of things that have become annoying since becoming a parent.

1. The UPS guy who rings the doorbell

Pre-kids, the UPS guy ringing my doorbell was a neutral event in my day. Actually, it was probably an enjoyable event in my day; because it meant some fun item or another awaited me in a package. Now I sort of want to punch the UPS guy (or anyone for that matter) who dares to ring my door bell and wake my baby from his nap.

2. The fact that Costco doesn’t open until 10:00 AM

Before parenthood, I rarely tackled errands before 10:00 AM—because, sleeping in on Saturdays. But now? 10:00 AM rolls around and I’ve probably been up for four hours. I mean, seriously? The day is halfway over by 10:00, Costco. The parents of this nation need economy size boxes of baby wipes and 3-packs of milk and we need it before 10:00 AM. Perhaps I should start a petition.

3. The chatty checker at the grocery store

OK, this was a little annoying before kids as well, but after kids it’s on another level. I’m sorry chatty checker, I really don’t want to hear your life story and I definitely don’t want to tell you mine while my kid is making a mess. I don’t even care. Not even a little bit.

4. Any and all lines

Waiting in lines is never a super fun task for anyone, but it had always just been a part of life. But waiting in lines with kids can be downright hellish. And waiting in line behind someone whose club card isn’t working or who can’t find a coupon while my kid is crying doing even get me started.

5.People who get offended by public breastfeeding

Before becoming a parent, I recognized that some people just don’t feel comfortable with breastfeeding in public. Even though I found it silly, it didn’t annoy me really. After becoming a parent, the ridiculousness of taking offense to breastfeeding annoys me to no end. Seriously people, you’ll see more cleavage walking past Victoria’s Secret on your mall walk then you’ll see while someone is feeding their baby. Get over it.

6.People who talk about their pets incessantly like they are their babies

I’ve never been a super huge animal person, but if other people want to compare and treat kids as a pet and talk about them as such who am I to resent them? Well, after having kids, I find the behavior a lot more annoying. And please do not compare your animal to my child. Totally not the same.

7.Phone calls over text

Talking on the phone is not my jam, but if I had information to communicate I had always been more than happy to give a quick phone call. Now, I basically send all phone calls straight to voicemail. I pretty much would like everyone I know to ask them before calling me: “Is this information that could be conveyed via a text message?” If the answer is yes, then please send a text. It will be much more pleasant for both of us to not have to carry on a conversation while my children yell in the background.

8.Glitter

I suppose the reason I never real took issue with glitter before having children is because I didn’t really have to encounter it very often in my daily life. In the adult world, very few things are festooned with glitter for glitter’s sake. Unfortunately I have learned that in the world of children glitter is on EVERYTHING. Literally everything. And subsequently it is all over my house as well. Glitter is most definitely the herpes of craft supplies and I wouldn’t be particularly sad if it no longer existed.

I identify myself on this POST ! Life changed drastically after having kids, I hope you identify also on this post from my blog about Things that become annoying after having kids

 

 

This Popular Sleep Aid May Be Harmful to Kids

There’s no quick fix that gets kids to sleep sooner, better, deeper. But melatonin comes pretty close.While medical experts don’t have much bad to say to adults about using melatonin, which isn’t a pharmaceutical rather a health supplement, some are concerned when it comes to regular use in children.

A recent New York Times Well blog post reported that while a lot of parents have given melatonin for their kids because it works—doctors don’t actually know whether it’s doing harm in the long run. Children’s brains are still growing and developing, and melatonin is a synthetic form of a hormone the pineal gland produces, and which signals to the brain it’s time for sleep.

“I think we just don’t know what the potential long-term effects are, particularly when you’re talking about young children,” said Dr. Judith Owens, director of the Center for Pediatric Sleep Disorders at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Parents really need to understand that there are potential risks.”

Research isn’t conclusive but some suggests that it could have effects not just on the brain but on other systems developing in children: reproductive, cardiovascular, immune and metabolic.

Melatonin has known possible side effects for adults, including “headaches, dizziness and daytime grogginess,” the Times reports. That last one is what makes it a sleep aid and also dangerous for drivers who might use it. The hormone-like substance, which is also found in foods like barley and walnuts, can also interfere with medications for blood pressure and diabetes.

When researchers looked into consistency across melatonin products, they found that 71 percent of their samples were at least 10 percent off from the written dose.

Doctors who treat sleep disorders in children have long known parents turn frequently turn to melatonin to help their kids with sleep issues, often picking up the pills at a health food store and not telling their own doctors—a mistake.

“I rarely see a family come in with a child with insomnia who hasn’t tried melatonin,” Owns said. “I would say at least 75 percent of the time when they come in to see us” at the sleep clinic, “they’re either on melatonin or they’ve tried it in the past.”

For those who give it to their children, Owens recommends letting their child’s doctor know. She also said the pills should be picked up from a reputable source. Because they’re not regulated by the Food and Drug Adminstration, there’s no way of know how much of the useful ingredient is in each pill. Buy “pharmaceutical grade,” which tend to have “more precise dosing levels.”

When researchers looked into consistency across melatonin products, they found that 71 percent of their samples were at least 10 percent off from the written dose. In fact—and this is where parents, particularly, should be cautious—some contained nearly 5 times the dosage written on the label.

So while there’s still no silver bullet for kids and sleep—except for lots of exercise, predictable nighttime routines and early (yes, early!) bedtimes—the melatonin temptation should be met with caution and some medical support.

Contributions on this post via Mom.me

2T vs 24 Months, What to Pick?

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If you’ve got a 2-year-old on your hands, you’ve probably reached a mommy milestone: the one where you wonder what the heck the difference is between a size 24-month garment in the baby department and the same basic garment that’s a size 2T in the toddler department. After all, 24 months is 2 years, right? (We’re pretty confident we’ve got the math right on that.) So why do both sizes exist — and which one should you buy for your child?

That all depends. Is your 24-month-old a baby or a toddler? Still confused? As far as fashion is concerned, if your child is crawling and wears a diaper, you’ve got a baby. If your child is walking and potty-trained, you’ve got a toddler on your hands. The difference between a size 24 months and a size 2T takes this into consideration to accommodate your child’s (and your) needs. “Babies come in all shapes and sizes, so some 12-month-olds could be wearing clothes that are size 18-24 months,” says Emily Meyer, co-founder and chief creative officer of Tea Collection. “That’s why the sizing for 24 months and 2T is different. The silhouette for 24-month sizes is rounder — ideal for a healthy, growing baby of any age who might still be crawling. Size 2T clothes, on the other hand, are intended for early walkers. The silhouette is less round and more upright to allow for easier movement as your little toddler starts to really get around.”

The differences between the two sizes also take moms into account. “Expect to find extra room for diapers and often snaps inside the legs to make changing easy,” says Mellicia Marx, owner of Poplin Style Direction, a personal style service that works with kids. “A toddler, according to brand logic, is likely potty-trained and no longer needs extra room for diapers. It’s also worth keeping in mind that kids’ clothes are usually sized in age ranges that end in the highest month. For instance, 24-month items are generally made for 18- to 24-month-old babies, and 2T is intended for 2- to 3-year-old kids.

Another difference? Clothes that are marked 24 months are usually more “babyish “in terms of style than those that are 2T. “If you prefer your little one to wear a miniature version of grownup clothes, you may find more selection in the 2T world,” says Marx.

 

 

Enforcing bed time to kids

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I am a stickler for a strict bedtime for my kid  specially during the week  since he was a baby because I think nothing is worse than greeting a lot of cranks attitudes  in the morning and specially to maintain a routine and for my mental health is also an advantage.

Now, a new study published in the journal BMC Public Health finds that enforcing a bedtime during the week means kids are more likely to meet established sleep guidelines, which benefits their overall health and well-being.

Researchers at Public Health Ontario, Canada looked at self-reported data from more than 1,600 parents with at least one kid younger than 18 and found that 94 percent of parents encouraged a specific bedtime. Meanwhile, 84 percent of parents went a step further and enforced bedtime rules. These parents were 59 percent more likely to have kids who met sleep guidelines on weekdays.

Dr. Heather Manson, senior author of the study, explains the different between encouraging and enforcing bedtimes, saying: “We found that ‘encouragement’ as a parental support was less effective for both weekend and weekday sleeps. Enforcement of rules around bedtimes had a significant impact, but only on weekdays. We can conclude that parents enforcing a bedtime on the weekday could help support their child to achieve sufficient sleep.”

Manson added, “Sleep is increasingly being recognized as an important determinant of health, and an integral component of healthy living for children, integrated with other behaviors such as physical activity and sedentary time. In the family context, parents’ support behaviors towards sleep could play an important role in their child’s health.”

 

What Parents Need to Know About the Child Who Died Under Dental Anesthesia

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Article original from Parents

Our hearts go out to the parents of the toddler who passed away during a dental procedure. And here’s what parents can take away from this unthinkable tragedy.

You may have read about Texas 14-month-old Daisy Lynn Torres, who passed away under anesthesia during a dental procedure back in March. But in case you’re seeing this heartbreaking story circulating again online, here’s what you need to know.

According to Yahoo News, a pediatric specialist at Austin Children’s Dentistry, Dr. Michael Melanson, at first informed Daisy’s mom, Betty Squier, that Daisy needed to be put under anesthesia to fill two cavities, because she wouldn’t be able to sit still long enough for the procedure.

But Squier recounted to Inside Edition that during the procedure, Dr. Melanson told her, “things have changed, [and it’s] six cavities. We’re going to go ahead and do 4 crowns and 2 fillings.”

Understandably, Squier wasn’t so sure putting a crown on baby teeth was necessary. But she explains, “I allowed him to do it because I trusted him.”

Unthinkably, Daisy went into cardiac arrest while under anesthesia. She was rushed to the hospital, where she later died.

The medical examiner concluded anesthesia likely killed this adorable little girl, according to the autopsy results. “One can only speculate as to why any treatment was performed considering no indication of dental disease or pathology,” the report also says.

In a statement to Inside Edition, Dr. Melanson’s attorney said, “There is no evidence that either the mother, the anesthesiologist, or the dentist did anything to cause the event. The best interest of the child was everyone’s only goal. Our hearts continue to go out to the family.”

As does mine. I am shattered for this mom.

Even worse is that this is not the first case of something like this happening. In July, a 3-year-old girl in California died after being put under anesthesia for a dental procedure, according to People magazine. And in January of 2014, a Hawaiian 3-year-old lapsed into a coma and later died after being placed under “heavy sedation” in the dentist’s chair, the Association of Health Care Journalists reports. And those are just the cases that made headlines. As the Huffington Post reports, 31 kids have died under dental sedation in the past 15 years.

Given this scary statistic, and in light of the tragedy that took the life of Daisy and other kids mentioned here, we talked to Jade Miller, D.D.S., president of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), to ask what parents should know. When asked how young might be too young for general anesthesia, Dr. Miller replied, “The primary factor to consider is the severity of the dental disease. Young children with dental pain and/or infection require treatment at any age. Alternatives should be assessed to determine all options that may be available. In some cases, a general anesthesia is the very best approach for that child and can be completed in a safe and effective manner.”

If your dentist recommends general anesthesia, Dr. Miller said to keep these three tips in mind:

  • Get ALL your questions answered. “We always recommend if a parent has any concerns or questions related to their child’s dental care to make sure they are answered to their satisfaction,” Dr. Miller said.
  • Don’t be afraid to seek a second opinion. If you’re uncomfortable with or have questions about your child’s diagnosis or treatment, there’s no harm in talking to your child’s dentist or getting a second opinion.
  • Know your options. “Parents should understand any alternatives to a general anesthesia, which could include a conscious sedation and the advantages and disadvantages of an alternative approach,” Dr. Miller said. “They should ask about where the procedure will take place, such as in a surgery center or a dental office, and the experience and training of the anesthesia provider.”

My son was 2 years-old when I first took him to the dentist when he broke his frontal tooth, my first nightmare and first question was about the anesthesia, if gradually during the process he will be under general anesthesia or some type of local anesthesia, but the answer was NO.

I realize Daisy’s procedure was completely different, but the point is that I can relate to Squier trusting a medical professional’s advice as to how her daughter should be treated. And then, to have this happen? It’s unimaginable.

Mother Shares Her Heartbreaking Story As A Warning To All Mothers

Five years ago Jillian Johnson welcomed a healthy baby boy into the world via an emergency c-section.After around two hours, little Landon had latched perfectly onto his mother’s breast and began breastfeeding. Everything seemed normal.

Jarrod and I wanted what was best for Landon as every parent does for their child,” writes Jillian in a blog post for FedIsBest

“We took all of the classes. Bought and read all of the books. We were ready! Or so we thought….every class and book was geared toward breastfeeding and how it’s so important if you want a healthy child.”

Landon was born in a “Baby-Friendly” hospital which places focus on breastfeeding. (No formula was given out except for medical reasons in which case a prescription was required.)

As nurses and lactation consultations visited Jillian and Landon they commented how “he had a great latch and was doing fine”, although she says one did point out that due to Jillian’s PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) she may struggle to produce milk.

Despite this, she was still encouraged to exclusively breastfeed.

Jillian says Landon would not stop crying unless he was on the breast, so she continued to nurse him continuously, what the nurses described as “cluster feeding”.

“I recalled learning all about that in the classes I had taken and being a first-time mum, I trusted my doctors and nurses to help me through this – even more so since I was pretty heavily medicated from my emergency c-section and this was my first baby,” says Jillian.

“But I was wrong. I’ve learned I have to be my child’s number one advocate.”

Within 24 hours Landon has nursed for a total of 9.3 hours, had zero wet nappies with four dirty ones.

After 27 hours he had lost 4.67% of his birth weight.

On the second day he nursed for 14 hours total, her 3 wet nappies and 6 dirty ones.

After 53 hours he had lost 9.27% of his body weight.

According to the Australian Breastfeeding Association (ABA) a general guideline says that a baby loses 5-10% of birth weight in the first week and regains this by 2-3 weeks. 

“I had no idea that he was inconsolable because he was starving – literally.”

Landon and Jillian were sent home after just 64 hours (2.5 days).

12 Hours later, Landon went into cardiac arrest caused by dehydration. He was rushed to hospital and placed in NICU. 15 days later he was taken off life support.

“I still have many, many days of guilt and questions – what if I would’ve just given him a bottle? And anger because how would I have known.”

Jillian says she still struggles daily but that by sharing her story hopes Landon’s death won’t be in vain.

The Fed is Best Foundation is dedicated to the prevention of newborn and infant starvation from insufficient exclusive breastfeeding.

Their message is “Feed your baby. Feed them as much as they need to stay safe and satisfied. Only they know what they need.”

This article originally appeared on Marie Claire

Popular unisex baby names of 2017


Some of the best-known female celebrities have traditionally male names.

Unisex baby names have been gaining traction for some time now hands up who knows a Remy? and now baby name site Nameberry has listed the gender neutral monikers most likely to skyrocket in popularity this year. 

How do they know? Nameberry worked out which names had the most page views on their site in January 2017 compared to January 2016 and went from there.

These are the names worth knowing 

1. Quincy

2. Remi

3. Winter

4. Ellis

5. Arrow

6. Briar

7. Indigo

8. Sage

9. Sasha

10. Ray

This article appeared originally on Practical Parenting

Happy naming ! 

7 WAYS TO SOOTHE A SICK TOODLER 

As adults, the second we feel cold symptoms coming on we’re likely to pop open the medicine cabinet and raid the pills and syrups for something to make us feel better. However, when our young children fall ill, many medicines are an absolute no. We hate to see our sweet ones suffer not to mention our own lack of sleep and many parents feel helpless without a go-to medicine to ease their child’s symptoms. Here are some mom-tested, pediatrician approved tips and tricks to get you through your kiddo’s next nasty cold, naturally.

1. Prop them Up: Keeping a child sitting up may seem counter intuitive to soothing them to sleep, but angling your little one up with pillows at about a 45-degree angle can aid with nose drainage. Nasal symptoms are usually worsened by lying down, where post-nasal drip can run down the back of the throat or pool in the sinuses. Ditch the irritating cough or stuffy nose by propping up your child with pillows or even stacking books under the head of their mattress. If you can coax them to sleep in this position, it will keep them breathing easy throughout the night.

2. Honey for Your Honey: If you can’t give your little one medicine, what can be done? Honey may be the answer. This ages-old remedy has been scientifically proven to reduce cough frequency and severity. Two teaspoons about half an hour before bedtime can make everyone’s night more restful. However, do not give honey to babies under twelve months, as there is a risk for infant botulism, a rare but potentially deadly illness. Alternatively, you can also try agave syrup instead.

3. Saline and Steam: There’s a reason that a hot bath can cure what ails you. Breathing in steam can loosen up a stuffy nose and provide relief for irritated nasal passages. You can always run your child a warm (but not too hot) bath and trap steam in the bathroom by closing the door and keeping the exhaust fan off. A humidifier is a great investment and can seriously improve stuffy nights for you and the kiddos. Another safe option is saline nose spray. Gently tilt your child’s head back and deliver one or two sprays per nostril. Wait a couple of minutes, then use the nasal aspirator (or better yet, the snot sucker,) or have your child blow their nose gently.

 

4. Heat for Healing: Electric blankets and heating pads simply aren’t safe for child use. Yet, a heating pad can provide sweet relief for a kiddo suffering from body aches. Create your own heating pad with a sock (made of natural fibers) with rice inside. You can warm it up in the microwave to a safe temperature, and the rice retains heat for quite awhile. For extra soothing, add essential oils such as lavender or peppermint to aid with congestion issues.

 

5. Feed a Fever  and a Cold: While some age old adages are filled with wisdom, others are not so smart. The old expression “feed a fever, starve a cold” does more harm than good. Your child needs as many nutritious calories as she can get, especially if she’s under the weather, the chicken soup it really does help alleviate symptoms. So if your little one is a chicken fan, this is probably one of your best options.

 

6. Fluids, Fluids, Fluids : Another reason to give your sweet one chicken soup is that it contains liquid to keep them hydrated. One of the biggest factors that prolongs and worsens colds is dehydration, and it’s one of the more dangerous side effects of being sick. Keep pushing the fluids by having a sippy cup handy at all times and reminding your child to drink. Another way to sneak fluids in is to offer your child all natural or sugar free fruit Popsicle.

7. Rest and TLC: Parents are often reminded of the importance of routine in a child’s life (sometimes it feels like we’re beaten over the head with it!) However, when your little one is ill, let them set the schedule. Not nap time yet? That’s OK, she needs her rest. Get your cuddles on! Touch has been proven to lessen anxiety and decrease the time needed to recover from injury and illness.
Remember to follow the doctor’s orders regarding medication usage, and to seek medical attention if symptoms persist or get worse. It might be difficult caring for your little one when you feel like you can’t do anything to help without medication, but this list will give you a few things to try.

I hope you found 7 ways to soothe a sick toddler informative. Follow my blog for more useful tips and information about your kids and the parenting stage.

8 Baby Registry Mistakes to Avoid

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This weekend I spent some time with my mother and we stopped for lunch and at a place where there was a baby shower for a future mom. Immediately came to my mind when I was preparing my registry for my own and I remember some many items that were unnecessary…I am going to share the most common baby registry mistakes that we can avoid.

Don’t insist on everything new. If you have friends who are eager to give you some items, take them. Friends, relatives, and online groups often offer clothing they are happy to remove from their closets. Your baby is new but it doesn’t mean that everything has to be brand new.

Don’t go overstock. You see five packs of newborn bibs and you just put a ton on your list, or you registered for something like 20 white newborn onesies.

Don’t just register for infant items. Babies grow fast and you don’t need so many clothes in newborn or 0-3 months sizes. Make sure you get in some pajamas and clothes for everyday use in bigger sizes, also look for items that will grow with your child, for example the high chair that will convert into a booster seat or bottles with the adaptable sippy accessory.

Don’t register for items that you think maybe you might need. Bottle warmers; wipe warmers, and pacifier holders. More than likely you will never use these things. Based on my experience the most useless is the wipe and bottle warmer. It dries out the wipes and you will go through wipes quicker, a plastic wipes container comes in practically every box of wipes that is sometimes I experienced for myself.

Don’t register for expensive items. Hoping someone is going to buy you your crib or the furniture for your child’s room? Purchase the crib, the mattress, the car seat, and stroller in that way you won’t depend on someone purchasing it. You should absolutely register for less pricey essentials: diapers, formula, and the noose FridaBaby Nasal Aspirator you absolutely would need it.

Don’t register for a breast pump. This does not mean that you shouldn’t buy a breast pump. But you probably don’t need to register for one because of the Affordable Breast Act that offer free breast pumps for all mothers.

Don’t register for exclusive colors. I opted for neutral tones a tan high chair, red stroller, and black car seat, you can found out that later on you are having a boy or girl and it would be a relive knowing your would have the most important items.

Don’t get obsessed for the latest and greatest. Don’t neglect the products that may be more essential and practical such bottles, burp clothes, and diapers ( lots of diapers) Keep in mind that moms have been raising babies for millennial without the help of ultraviolet night baby monitors to mention some of them.

The latest and greatest thing that your baby will love more than anything else is not even on your registry, and it’s you.

This post contains a product that your cost will be the same but My Ten Tiny Toes will automatically receive a small commission if you purchase it through an affiliate link.

Strategies to prevent anxiety in kids

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We have not come to this world with a manual on how to be a parent; our main goal is to provide to our kids the best quality of life possible to raise happy and respectful humans. One of the most difficult issues that parents meet presently could be the anxiety in kids. Most of the common mistakes parents do when they see their children showing signs of anxiety are yelling, punishment, and the verbal threats that most of the times create more tension on them.

Remember that is not your goal to be the best parent in the world; your goal is to be there for your kids and be the best example where they can feel support and love. Most of the time you heard that anxiety in kids is transmitted by their parent but is not completely accurate.

All kids in some point of their life feel the fear to be abandoned, they cry in school, they feel unusual fears without a reason and sometimes they have gone through episodes in their life where they develop some type of anxiety, for example the experience to lose a familiar member that can generate some type of fear on them.

As a parents we can make their life so charming and calm as we would wish, the most important advice is to be there for them, to notice anything in particular that is not considered normal, learn to listen to them and understand them, educate based in intelligence and comprehension can help us to prevent the anxiety in our children.  They are evidence that sometimes if at least one of the parents presents some type of anxiety their kids will develop some type of anxiety between the age of 6 and 13 years old but there is not a specific reason to develop it, sometimes is a combination of genetic and some environmental factors.

The most important thing is that if one of the parents present some type of anxiety needs to be treated and be conscious that is crucial in the development of our kids.

Let’s have in practice some strategies on how to prevent and challenge anxiety in our kids:

  1. Kids need to confront their fears: Is normal to protect our kids, but overprotective is not really healthy for them, we need to let them be capable to challenge their fears, once they test their fears they will feel proud of themselves.
  2. Use positive messages to communicate to them: Congratulate your kids for each task they perform good, and the most important thing is to avoid and criticize something when they do it wrong. Never used depreciate words because in the future they will remember them and will cause a stage on anxiety at some point.
  3. Understand what is important to them: Sometimes we criticize things that for them are important and we somewhat for lack of time and dedication are not noticed. Always listen what they want to say to you.
  4. Talk to your kids about everything that cause them distress or fear: Talk to them in a comprehensive way and with attention, always provide support and conform to them.

Parenting is not easy,  every day is a challenge.

If you are interesting in more tips and informative articles follow my blog, I am a mother becoming a blogger as a hobby and believe in all my post and informative tips.