Flavor Your Life. Is Cooking with Olive Oil Dangerous?


I learned about this Zucchi olive oil applying to the blogger program through Moms. Meet, the experience was pleasant, even that I enjoy Olive Oil I love this type fresh flavor, and pure smell that I experience in this sampling campaign. I loved the presentation, the kit and the convenience container to keep it fresh and easy to use for my daily cooking routine.

Zucchi 100% Italian Extra Virgin Olive Oil combines quality and tradition in a blend of carefully selected extra virgin oils made by the mechanical cold-pressing of Italian olives only.

You’ve probably heard that olive oil is great for drizzling and dressing, but bad for high-heat cooking like sautéing and roasting. Maybe you’ve also heard that olive oil develops dangerous toxic compounds when you use it with high heat. Olive oil is perfectly safe to cook with. “I have found no evidence that high-heat cooking with olive oil is unhealthy,” says Rebecca Blake, RD, director of clinical nutrition at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in New York City. “There’s no proof.”

Still, this is not to say that you should run off and deep-fry a turkey in for dinner tonight. Here’s everything you need to know about cooking with olive oil:

  1. Choose the right olive oil for the job.
    Extra virgin isn’t the only game in town. There are several different varieties of olive oils, all of which have different flavor profiles, smoke points (more on that later), and cooking purposes. Follow this quick guide to make the best choice for your dish:
  • Extra virgin: Made from the first cold pressing of olives, this has the strongest, fruitiest, and arguably most pleasant flavor. Use in dressings, dips, and garnishes to allow the robust flavor to shine. It’s also a fine choice for sautéing.
  • Virgin: Made from the second pressing of olives, virgin has a milder flavor. Use in medium-heat sautéing and pan-frying.
  • Pure: Made from the second pressing of olive or by a chemical extraction process, pure olive oil isn’t exactly “pure” and lacks the flavor and fragrance of extra virgin and virgin. Use in roasting, baking, or deep-frying.
  • Light: Don’t be fooled—light olive oil isn’t lower in fat or calories than other types of oil. And this type should actually be avoided, since it’s made from a combination of virgin and refined oils, and lacks both the flavor and health benefits of virgin and extra virgin.
  1. Don’t hit the smoke point.

Smoke point is the temperature at which oil starts to break down. You’ll know its happening when the oil starts to, well, smoke. Each type of olive oil has a slightly different smoke point:

    • Extra virgin: 375 to 405°F
    • Virgin: 390°F
    • Pure: 410°F
    • Light: 470°F

Do your best to avoid the smoke point. While it’s not harmful to your health, Blake explains, cooking oil past its smoke point can cause nutrient loss and create unpleasant off-flavors that’ll affect the taste of the finished dish. I hope you found this article Is Cooking with Olive Oil Dangerous? informative and useful for your daily cooking activities. Sometimes information is misunderstand.

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